Identify Funding Opportunities Proposal Development Award Management Compliance Review and Oversight Education and Training Technology Transfer
Office of Research and Technology Management
Identify Funding Proposals Proposal Development Award Management Compliance Review and Oversight Education and Training Technology Transfer

Limited Submission

Charles A. Dana Foundation: David Mahoney Neuroimaging Program

Key Deadlines: November 21, 2017 (CWRU internal letter of intent), January 29, 2018 (CWRU internal submission deadline); February 5, 2018 (ANTICIPATED Sponsor submission deadline).

The Dana Foundation's neuroimaging research program focuses on improving human brain and brain-immune functioning to promote health, and prevent and treat disease. Funds support pilot-testing by investigators, who are early in their research careers, to enable them to pursue promising, high-risk, and innovative ideas that have a direct clinical application. The pilot data are anticipated to help increase competitiveness for seeking larger-scale support from other funders. Grant amounts for each study may be up to $200,000 total, payable over three years. Applicants will be informed within eight weeks of the preliminary proposal deadline on whether they are invited to prepare full proposals.

The Dana Foundation supports research on imaging innovations that help reveal how the human brain functions normally, how disorders and injuries alter these functions, and how various therapies affect these conditions. Since immune cells are often integrally involved in the development of, protection against, or responses to brain diseases and injuries, funded research also can focus on immune cell interactions with brain cells.

Scientists, using either conventional brain imaging techniques, cellular and molecular imaging technologies, or a combination of both, are supported to undertake pilot tests of novel hypotheses. These data then can be used to compete for larger-scale funding from other sources. Studies tend to focus on how imaging can enhance understanding of normal brain functioning; improve diagnosis; expand understanding of disease or injury processes; and assess treatment effects. Additionally, studies designed to refine existing imaging techniques, or to further develop new techniques to address specific clinical questions, are supported.

The Program is designed to enable investigators to obtain pilot data more quickly than is possible through other funding processes. Please note that this will be The Dana Foundation's only proposal solicitation process this year, and selection will be extremely competitive, with fewer than 10 percent of preliminary proposals ultimately resulting in funding. Below is a description of the program and application process.

This program, like all other Dana-supported research, is designed to improve human health. Investigations need to be applicable to human brain or brain-immune functioning or malfunctioning. To be considered for funding, submitted proposals should focus on imaging in patients or patient tissues, and healthy volunteers.

The official announcement and description of this opportunity will be found on the sponsor's website in December 2017.

Number of Applications Allowed: One

Amount of Funding: up to $200,000, payable over three years

Program Website: http://dana.org/grants/imaging

Eligibility

Applicants are encouraged to consult with their Associate Deans for Research prior to internal submission to assure they meet eligibility criteria and their projects meet stated program objectives.

Emphasis in the David Mahoney Neuroimaging program is on assisting promising early career investigators to obtain pilot study data concerning novel hypotheses that will help them compete for larger-scale funding from other sources. To be eligible, applicants must have faculty appointments. Early career investigators most often are investigators at the assistant professor level and those who are in their early years of their associate professor appointments. Senior investigators may apply only if the proposed study represents a new research direction. Please see eligibility criteria specified in the RFP on the program website (available at some point in December 2017). Assistant professors are eligible, as are associate professors, especially those in their early years of their associate professorship. Full professors are only eligible to apply if their proposals represent a new research direction in their work. Post-docs are not eligible to apply unless they can provide evidence that they will have a faculty appointment prior to the start of the grant period.

Submission Process
   Step 1

For consideration as a finalist, investigators must submit the following proposal materials as a single PDF email attachment to Stephanie Endy at stephanie.endy@case.edu no later than 5:00 p.m. on November 21, 2017:

  1. A one-page, 12-point font, one-inch margin cover letter, including PI name, department/division, school/college, project title and brief summary of how the project will help reveal how the human brain functions normally, how disorders and injuries alter these functions, how various therapies affect these conditions, and/or immune cell interactions with brain cells, and
  2. A federal-grant-style biosketch (typically NIH or NSF).
   Step 2

Final nominees will be notified of their selection by December 8, 2017.

   Step 3

Final proposal must be received by the Office of Research Administration by January 29, 2018 at 5:00pm EST.

   Step 4

Final proposal must be received by the sponsor by February 5, 2018 at 3:00pm EST. (ANTICIPATED)

Deadlines
Deadline
Action
Days to the Deadline
11/21/2017
Letter of intent due to Stephanie Endy
Past
12/8/2017
LOI review completed
Past
1/29/2018
Proposal due to ORA
42
2/5/2018
Proposal due to sponsor (ANTICIPATED)
49

Please contact Stephanie Endy in the Office of Research Administration at stephanie.endy@case.edu if you have questions about the process.

This page was last updated: 08/29/17